FLU

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine each year.

People who have the flu often feel some or all of these signs and symptoms:

  • Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches

Kern County Public Health Clinic

1800 Mt. Vernon Avenue

Bakersfield, CA 93306

Call (661)321-3000

Most experts believe that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby. Less often, a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or possibly their nose.

Anyone can get the flu (even healthy people), and serious problems related to the flu can happen at any age, but some people are at high risk of developing serious flu-related complications if they get sick. This includes people 65 years and older, people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), pregnant women, and young children.

The time from when a person is exposed to flu virus to when symptoms begin is about 1 to 4 days, with an average of about 2 days.

You may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Some people, especially young children and people with weakened immune systems, might be able to infect others for an even longer time.

Take time to get a flu vaccine.

Take time to get a flu vaccine like this young boy from an older female nurse.

  • CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses.
  • While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the viruses that research suggests will be most common. (SeeVaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.)
  • Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations and deaths.
  • Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine as soon as the current season’s vaccines are available.
  • Vaccination of high risk persons is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness.
  • People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older.
  • Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu to them.
  • Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness, but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for infants should be vaccinated instead.

Step Two

Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs like this mother teaching her young child to wash hands.

  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone for 24 hours without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.
  • See Everyday Preventive Actions[257 KB, 2 pages] and Nonpharmaceutical Interventions (NPIs) for more information about actions – apart from getting vaccinated and taking medicine – that people and communities can take to help slow the spread of illnesses like influenza (flu).

Step 3

Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them like this older woman listening to her doctor.

  • If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can be used to treat your illness.
  • Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter.
  • Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications. For people with high risk factors[702 KB, 2 pages], treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.
  • Studies show that flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within 2 days of getting sick, but starting them later can still be helpful, especially if the sick person has a high-risk health condition or is very sick from the flu. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking this drug.
  • Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people also may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, and have respiratory symptoms without a fever.

Visit CDC’s website to find out what to do if you get sick with the flu.

Clinic Information

Kern County Public Health Clinic

1800 Mt. Vernon Avenue

Bakersfield, CA 93306

Call (661)321-3000

EVENTS

Flu Clinics

The Swap Meet at the Fairgrounds October 15th 7am – Noon

The Hosking Ave Swap Meet October 27th 5pm – 8pm

Public Health Flu Clinics

  • Public Health Services Building at 1800 Mt. Vernon Avenue, Bakersfield – Beginning October 2, Monday through Friday 8am-11am and 1pm-3pm
  • Arvin Public Health Services Office at 204 S. Hill Street, Arvin – Wednesdays from October 4, 2017 through November 29, 2017 9am – 11am and 1pm – 3pm
  • Delano Public Health Services Office at 455 Lexington Street, Delano – Wednesdays from October 4, 2017 through November 29, 2017 9am – 11am and 2pm – 4pm
  • Shafter Public Health Services Office at 329 Central Valley Hwy, Shafter – Wednesdays from October 4, 2017 through November 25, 2017 1pm – 3:30pm
  • Hyatt Consulting Group Office at Sun Plaza at 6416 Lake Isabella Blvd, Suite C-1, Lake Isabella – Wednesday, October 18, 2017 from 11am – 3pm and Wednesday, November 15, 2017 from 11am – 3pm
  • Rosamond Library at 3611 Rosamond Blvd, Rosamond – Thursday, October 19, 2017 from 10am – 3pm and Tuesday, November 21, 2017 from 10am – 3pm
  • Taft Public Health Office at 915 N 10th Street, Taft – Thursday, October 26, 2017 from 11am – 4pm and Thursday, November 30, 2017 from 11am – 4pm
  • Ridgecrest Public Health Office at 400 N. China Lake Blvd, Ridgecrest – Thursday October 26, 2017 from 10:30am – 2:30pm and Thursday, November 16, 2017 from 10:30am – 2:30pm

$9.00 per shot, walk-ins welcome