Water

HOME WATER SAFETY

Among preventable injuries, drowning is the leading cause of death for children 1 – 4 years old. Children less than a year old are more likely to drown at home in the bathroom or a bucket.

  1. Watch kids when they are in or around water, without being distracted. Keep young children within arm’s reach of an adult.
  2. Empty all tubs, buckets, containers and kiddie pools immediately after use. Store them upside down so they don’t collect water.
  3. Close toilet lids and use toilet seat locks to prevent drowning. Keep doors to bathrooms and laundry rooms closed.
  4. Install fences around home pools. A pool fence should surround all sides of the pool and be at least four feet tall with self-closing and self-latching gates.
  5. Know what to do in an emergency. Learning CPR and basic water rescue skills may help you save a life.

Learn more Here

This report uncovers misconceptions families have that can lead to drowning and shows them how to keep kids safe in and around water.

Read more  Here

Each year in the United States, more than 2,200 children – or six kids a day – die from an injury in the home. Find out how safe your home is.

Find out Here

SWIMMING SAFETY

When children are swimming and there are several adults present, make sure kids are actively supervised at all times by choosing a Water Watcher. A Water Watcher is a responsible adult who agrees to watch the kids in the water without distractions and wear a Water Watcher card. After a certain amount of time (such as 15-minutes), the Water Watcher card is passed to another adult, who is responsible for the active supervision.

If you would like to pick up a Water Watcher lanyard and card please contact (661) 868-1202. 

Water Watcher Card

Children 1 – 4 years old are more likely to drown in a pool. Children 5 years and older are more likely to drown in natural water, such as ponds, lakes and rivers.

  • Watch kids when they are in or around water, without being distracted. Keep young children within arm’s reach of an adult. Make sure older children swim with a partner every time.
  • Teach children how to swim. Every child is different, so enroll children in swim lessons when they are ready. Consider their age, development and how often they are around water.
  • Make sure kids learn how to swim and develop these five water survival skills:
    • step or jump into water over their heads and return to the surface;
    • float or tread water for one minute;
    • turn around in a full circle and find an exit;
    • swim 25 yards to exit the water; and
    • exit the water. If in a pool, be able to exit without using the ladder
  • Teach children that swimming in open water is not the same as swimming in a pool. They need to be aware of uneven surfaces, river currents, ocean undertow and changing weather.
  • Know what to do in an emergency. Learning CPR and basic water rescue skills may help you save a child’s life.

Learn more HERE

In warm weather, oceans, lakes, and rivers are a source of swimming enjoyment across the country each year for about 91 million people over the age of 16

Beaches

Local Beach Information

Before you go to the Beach

Lakes & Rivers

Lakes, Rivers and Streams Swimming

 

Other Helpful Resources:

Water Safety for Lakes, Rivers and Beaches

Sources:

CDC, American Red Cross ,State Department of Health

Pool Safety Checklist

6 things parents need to know to keep kids safe at the pool. Do you know all these tips?

Pool Safety Poster

Post this helpful poster at your community pool to help parents prevent drowning. Do you know the 5 water survival skills?

Dangerous Waters Research

This research report explores the 3 places kids are likely to drown: at home in bathtubs, at the pool and in natural water. We look at ages, gender and race to see how the risks differ.

Find our More

Danger of Drowning Infographic

This infographic illustrates the scope of the drowning problem in the U.S., common misconceptions families have, and smart tips to protect kids

BOATING SAFETY

In 2013, 77 percent of all fatal boating accident victims drowned, and of those who drowned, 84 percent were not wearing a life jacket.

  1. Always have your children wear a life jacket approved by the U.S. Coast Guard while on boats, around open bodies of water or when participating in water sports. Make sure the life jacket fits snugly. Have the child make a “touchdown” signal by raising both arms straight up; if the life jacket hits the child’s chin or ears, it may be too big or the straps may be too loose.
  2. A large portion of boating accidents each year involve alcohol consumption by both boat operators and passengers. To keep you and your loved ones safe, it is strongly recommended not to drink alcoholic beverages while boating.
  3. Infants and young kids are at a higher risk for hypothermia, so if you are taking a baby on a boat, just take a few extra precautions to keep your baby warm. If your children seem cold or are shivering, wrap them tightly in a dry blanket or towel.
  4. We know you have a million things to do, but learning CPR should be on the top of the list. It will give you tremendous peace of mind – and the more peace of mind you have as a parent, the better. Local hospitals, fire departments and recreation departments offer CPR training.
  5. Teach children that swimming in open water is not the same as swimming in a pool: They need to be aware of uneven surfaces, river currents, ocean undertow and changing weather.

Learn more HERE

  1. Always have your children wear a life jacket approved by the U.S. Coast Guard while on boats, around open bodies of water or when participating in water sports.
  2. Make sure the life jacket fits snugly. Have kids make a “touchdown” signal by raising both arms straight up; if the life jacket hits a child’s chin or ears, it may be too big or the straps may be too loose.

Learn more Here

Download these tips top make your next boating trip a safe one.